GTS Bream Series Fishing Competition 2016

GTS Bream Series Fishing Competition: Round 2 – North

Gamakatsu Team Series Tournament: Round 2 North Bream Series 2016. Brought to you by Lowance, the 2016 GTS Bream Series Round 2 North is on this coming weekend on Sunday, 28 February 2016 at the Fingal Heads Harbour, drive through recommended for weigh in at Fingal Heads Boat Ramp.

Basic Event Info: If you are just over the border in Queensland, please keep in mind event times are based of local day light savings time.

  1. $150 entry fee
  2. Sign-up/Check-in: 5:30am
  3. Briefing: 6:15am
  4. Competition Starts: 6:30am
  5. Finishes 1:00 pm
  6. Weigh-in Starts: 12:45pm
  7. Presentation: Approx 1:30pm (after all boats have weighed in)
  8. GTS Events are run in conjunction with GAS events, and normal GTS Rules apply.
  9. Speed limits are in affect, if anyone is caught speeding or is fined by the waterways, you/your team will be automatically disqualified from the event with no refund/s. It is your own responsibilities to know the local fishing/marine rules and laws, however, if you don’t know then ask.

Accommodation: No recommended Accommodation for this event.

Boundaries: Anywhere in the river to the North Tip of the River mouth across to the South Tip of the River mouth is able to be fished. 15m from the furthest point of the Marinas edge is out of bounds. This includes no casting or entering except in emergencies

 


Tohatsu Outboard 2-stroke Motors

Tohatsu Outboard 2-stroke Motors Boat Motors

Tohatsu Outboard Boat Motor

Tohatsu Outboard 2-stroke Motors Now Available at Tweed Tackle and Marine.

Tweed Tackle and Marine are proud to announce they have a wide range of Tohatsu Outboard Motors available for purchase. Head instore or jump on our website to browse our Tohatsu Outboard Motors Range.

Tohatsu Outboard Motors 2-stroke are world famous for their reliability, terrific-horsepower-to-weight ratios and top-of-the-line performances! These Tohatsu Outboard 2-stroke Motors will give you performance and reliability for your long days of boating pleasure. Tohatsu Outboard 2-stroke Motors provide all of the extra features you want and need without compromising Tohatsu’s well-known quality.

Tohatsu Outboard 2-stroke Motors benefits:

  •  Excellent reliability with proven 2-stroke technology
  •  Simple in design
  •  Integral tank for ease of transport

Tohatsu Outboard Motor

Easy operation and handling:

  •  Loop charged induction for smooth operation and fuel economy
  •  CD ignition system for quicker starts
  •  Tohatsu Outboard 2-stroke Motors Carrying handle

Fundamentals for user convenience and reliability:

  •  High grade marine aluminum alloy that provides the ultimate  protection against corrosion
  •  Zinc coating on internal water passages for superior corrosion  resistance
  •  Gear Shifton side of engine: Forward (F) – Neutral (N) – Reverse (R)
  •  Built-in fuel tank 2.5 litre and Separate fuel tank 12 litre
  •  Through the prop exhaust to reduce noise
  •  Shallow water drive
  •  Stainless steel water pump housing for durability
  •  Aluminium propeller

Protection:

  •  Safety lanyard (an essential protection feature standard on all  Tohatsu outboard motors)

These products are only available to pickup in store.
If you wish to purchase this product, please come visit us at:

Tohatsu Outboard Motor 2 Stroke SS 18hp Boat Motor

13 Greenway Drive
P O Box 6545, Tweed Heads South
NSW, 2486

Tweed Tackle and Marine your local Tohatsu Outboard 2-stroke Motors supplier, will match any retail price. Come in and join the Marlin Club, build up credits as well as gain access to all kinds of special offers.

Forgot something? Let Tweed Tackle and Marine your Tohatsu Outboard 2-stroke Motors suppliers, deliver to your home or work. We offer a 3 hour free delivery in Tweed Heads/Tweed Heads South- Ordering online from our website – www.tackandmarine.com.au

Come in and check out Tweedy’s awesome opening specials and see what a specialist fishing store can offer you. Come in and bring photos of your catches to be in the “Fishing of the Month” contest.

Need to contact us?

At Tweed Tackle and Marine, we consider customer loyalty important. For any enquires just click here and fill out our contact form and one of our colleagues will get back to you as soon as possible!

You can also like us on Facebook and follow us on instagram @tweedtackleandmarine


Local Fishing Gear Suppliers

Local Fishing Gear Suppliers Tweed Heads NSW

Local Fishing Gear Suppliers

Tweed Tackle and Marine are located in Tweed Heads. Tweedy says “We put Fishing First”. We have all your favourite brands in store. We are offering a personal touch service- rods that need repairing, or that reel that needs spooling. Tweedy and his team add lots of extra services: Fishing Licences, Bulk line winding, Bulk oils, Boat code etc.

Tweed Tackle and Marine your local fishing gear suppliers, provide all your fishing, boating and Marine needs. Plus trailers, rod repairs, reel spooling,Boatcode, Fishing licences, etc. Tweedy will match any retail price. Products include:

  • Fishing Licences NSW
  • Frozen Bait – Live Worms
  • Boat Accessories
  • Tohatsu Portable Outboard Motors
  • Block Ice
  • Rapala
  • Ugly Fish Sunglasses
  • Maxus Outboard Motors
  • Boat Code
  • Okuma
  • Live Beach Worms
  • Gas Refills – only $20 for 9kg
  • Fishing Rod Repairs
  • Ocean Stream
  • Kayak Trolleys
  • Haswing Electric Motors
  • Abu Garcia Veritas II Combos – latest model only $169.
  • Trailer Parts
  • Fish Chiller bags
  • Beacon to Beacon
  • Fishing Shirts
  • Predapro
  • Crab Nets

And so much more!

Tweed Tackle and Marine your local fishing gear suppliers, will match any retail price. Come in and join the Marlin Club, build up credits as well as gain access to all kinds of special offers.

Forgot something? Let Tweed Tackle and Marine your local fishing gear suppliers, deliver to your home or work. We offer a 3 hour free delivery in Tweed Heads/Tweed Heads South- Ordering online from our website – www.tackandmarine.com.au

Come in and check out Tweedy’s awesome opening specials and see what a specialist fishing store can offer you. Come in and bring photos of your catches to be in the “Fishing of the Month” contest.

Need to contact us?

At Tweed Tackle and Marine, we consider customer loyalty important. For any enquires just click here and fill out our contact form and one of our colleagues will get back to you as soon as possible!

You can also like us on Facebook and follow us on instagram @tweedtackleandmarine


Fishing Tips and Tricks

Fishing Tips and Tricks

Fishing Tips and Tricks

Catching the big one is only half the fun; preparation and the actual time spent going after that prize fish is also an enjoyable part of this sport.

Everyone who enjoys fishing has their own special tricks, but in general there are some common tips to follow. Fishing is a sport that requires knowledge of the water area and the type of fish you are trying to catch. You need a minimum of equipment, at least a line and hook plus some accessories, bait and a tackle box. Different fish have different habits, so a little advance studying is helpful for learning where to go and what time of day is best. Finally, be prepared to spend some long, quiet hours where patience is indeed a virtue. These top 5 fishing & tricks should help in our quest for the perfect catch.

Fishing Tips and Tricks

Ask ten fishermen/women about their secrets for successful fishing and you will get ten different answers. The reason for this is that everyone has developed fishing techniques over time, often from tips passed along by their elders, and they are not fishing for the same type of fish. Fish are unique, despite their common tendencies to hang together in schools. Trout, panfish, salmon, bass and perch frequent different parts of lakes, rivers, bays and streams. What works for one type of fish may not work at all for another type of fish.

Here are the top 5 fishing tricks and tips to catch fish, no matter what skill level you are at:

  1. Basic knowledge – know what kind of fish you want to catch, and learn about their habits and habitat. Time of day is important; some fish will bite best in the morning, while others are hungrier in the afternoon. Some like cold water and others stick to the warmer shallows. Be sure to check the weather report before you head out on the waterways.
  2. Proper equipment – for simple fishing off a dock, rowboat or shoreline, you need a basic fishing set that includes a rod, reel, line and hooks. Tackle boxes are ideal for carrying and sorting small equipment like sharp hooks, lures, extra line and a knife. Fill your tackle box with a flashlight, adjustable wrench, pliers, first aid supplies, spare hooks and rod tips, glue stick and a lighter.
  3. Bait – even fish have different preferences when it comes to food. Use bait that your target fish enjoy. Cover the hook with the worm or other bait, so the fish gets set on a good hook when they chomp down on the tempting bait. Some artificial and electronic baits appeal to certain types of fish but not others. Don’t go looking for perch with bait designed to attract salmon. Shiny reflective lures can sun blind certain fish; use matted metal lures instead.
  4. Get maps and local reports – check at the nearest bait shops for local topographical maps and fishing activity reports before you head out for the day fishing. Maps that show the contour bottom of lakes and rivers help you find the drop-offs and other locations that certain fish prefer, like deep holes or mossy areas near the shoreline. Other fishermen can advise you (if they will) about where the fish are biting that day.
  5. Peace and patience – keep noise to a minimum, but bring along something to help you pass time; be patient. Keep a close watch for any fishing line movement; a quick hard tug is a chance to hook a fish if you are ready.

Once you have filled your quota of fish for the day, it’s time for your inner chef to take over. Prepare the fish properly for transport home for freezing or cooking. If you brought along dining equipment, enjoy a hot shore dinner that has no equal.


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Teaching Children Fishing Preparation

Teaching Children Fishing Preparation

Teaching Children Fishing Preparation

Get the kids a small tackle box with a few of the sinkers and swivels they will need and take the hooks and crush or grind the barbs flat. Why? so if they happen to stick one in themselves they can be easily removed without a trip to a surgeon.Think of a fishing area where bites and hookups are very likely, they don’t have to be big fish but they should be in such numbers that there will be a more than even chance of them hooking something to keep their interest up. Fish like whiting and herring or any other species that is happy to take a bait and has very few spines or teeth are great targets.

Consider additional activities that will be available. On a beach catching worms, crabs, digging pippis, pumping yabbies or other bait can be fun, while a jetty or shore might include looking under rocks, skipping stones or just watching different boats going past. In boats in particular some proven toys or games might be the way to go, or sitting at the wheel “driving the boat” with the motor off can also amuse the young mind. Simply consider things that will keep them from getting bored.

Take a change of cloths for them, they are going near water so they are almost certainly going to find a way to get wet and with luck might even get some slimey smelly stuff on them from either a caught fish or at least some bait. Bring plenty of water, hats, sunscreen and anything else to avoid sunburn or dehydration in the sun and maybe a few snacks or treats because we are making certain this is going to be a good day.

Ok we have arrived at our fishing spot, one last run through with the little ones on what to do. If
they can do something themselves let them, if they can’t let them try at least once, then do it if they can’t. Talk them through everything, why something is done that way, how it is done, what they can expect, then start on the guessing games, do you think a big one will take your line? have you had a bite? stay ready these fish are tricky and will sneak up on you, wow look how much this one is pulling your line, all delivered in an excited voice as it is infectious and your enthusiasm will transfer to them. If something doesn’t go right use an “ah well doesn’t matter” type tone and just correct the problem.

If casting isn’t going so well offer to cast for them and practice a few more times at home before you have your next trip. Just remember if you are fishing off a jetty the fish often the fish are sitting in close to the piles so distance casting isn’t always necessary. You may however need to replace a lot more hooks if fishing close to the structure.

Don’t expect to hold their attention for much more than 10 to 20 minutes at a time, this is why we have other options to go to. At the first hint of them losing interest and drifting away change to a new activity, then when that gets old say “hey do you think the fish might be biting now, lets try fishing again” in a positive excited voice, they should follow.

If all goes well a small whiting or bream should find juniors hooks and after a *huge* struggle be landed, with a huge fuss being made of the capture “Woooohoooo your first fish, how cool is that, I thought it was going to pull you in”. A quick check to make sure the fish is safe for them to handle, if not remove it for them, and get out the measuring stick / tape measure. Regardless of whether it is obviously over or under the legal size limit for the species we are going to measure this fish for a lot of good reasons. One, this is their first ever fish so it is good to have all the stats for them. Second, it’s something that expands on the experience and a new activity. Third, it is good practice to get them into being aware there is a size limit on different species and that keeping undersize fish is against the law. This final one also helps to explain why if the fish is too small we have to let it go.

Before we go any further I strongly recommend NOT allowing your kids to kiss a fish before releasing it. It may make good television for personalities developing their brands but it is a very dangerous practice for children. Fish are slippery suckers and children most times will have a very light grasp of them. Allowing biting teeth and sharp fins to get anywhere near to a childs face is in my opinion a stupid thing to do, and just asking for trouble. A scarred lip from a bite or an eye blinded by a fin spike is not my idea of a fun day out. Saying “bye bye fishy” “come back when you are bigger” or “see you next year” and giving him a wave as he slips back into the water and shoots back to the bottom is enough.

In summary,

  • try and remove problems before they become a problem
  • practice the basics at home
  • continually talk excitedly about even the smallest things
  • plan and have alternate activities and change them before they become boring
  • have trips by yourself for serious fishing, so YOU don’t become bored and frustrated
  • have fun and don’t expect too much too quickly

Maybe I am biased but I think kids that fish are calmer, better behaved and a lot more grounded. As they get older they seem to exhibit patience beyond their years and their powers of observation are usually far better than other children their age. The added bonus is in the future they might take YOU fishing one day and give you a few lessons on the latest greatest methods available. I hope your days fishing with your children can be even half as good as those I have spent with mine.


Teaching Children to Fish

Teaching Children to Fish

Teaching Children to Fish

One of the greatest pleasures for a fisherman is to share your joy of fishing with your kids, so teaching them to fish should be a high priority. This should be fun because not only are children overjoyed by the idea of joining in an otherwise adult pursuit with mum and dad but the adventure aspect is just as intoxicating for their young and impressionable minds.But a word of warning, young children have very short attention spans and expecting them to fish for several hours especially when things are quiet, can lead to a potentially exciting excursion turning into the outing from hell.

A fun fishing day out with the kids should have them as the primary focus and fishing being just part of the days entertainment.

Ok where to start?. Probably the best place to begin is well before you even go near the water. Fishing is can be frustrating when you first start learning, those tricky little rods and reels just don’t do what you want them to do and cause all sorts of problems. Casts that drop behind your back, tangles, nasty hooks that can embed themselves in soft parts of the body and lots of other things can cause not only frustration, but pain anger and a whole other range of negative emotions. It’s therefore preferable to try and minimize these before we get serious and go anywhere near the water. Planning and some basic training are going to make that first real fishing day go that bit smoother and can be fun on it’s own teaching the girls and boys a few do and don’ts on some quiet windy Sunday.

At home bring out the rod and reel they will be using when they actually go fishing and show
them how it works, turn spools or bail arms, setting drags, winding in line, casting etc etc, basically everything they will be required to know and do for real. Don’t go into too much detail initially, just small bits of information becoming more detailed as they start to grasp the basics and are ready for more. This is fun so we remove hooks and sinkers and tie on something like a plastic fish toy they may have or something else soft that won’t take a window out if they just happen to launch one.

Show them a small cast yourself, then hand them the rod and walk them through the technique, correcting errors in as simple and fun a manner as is possible, eg “otoh that one went loopdy loop, I think you let the line go a bit early, try and hold it just a little longer”. If things aren’t going well take a break, grab a drink of water because it’s hot work fishing, then come back and have them try again. If it becomes a task, call it a day and try again at another time.

If all is going well, start to mix things up, take a bucket and place it within their casting range and make it ten points or a treat if they can cast into the bucket. After a couple of casts grab their line and start pulling “hey you have got a big one on, better play it”. This breaks up the casting training and gives them some winding and drag practice while hopefully putting a smile on their face as mum or dad plays the goat running around with the line.

With luck this will have given your child an idea of what to expect and maybe ironed out a few kinks in their technique, giving you a few less things to do when you do take them fishing.

The fishing practice is done (well some of it anyway) now it’s time for some planning for the fishing trip.


Fishing Preparation

Summer Fishing Preparation Part 1

Fishing Preparation

Summer heralds the time that many of us fish more often as the weather is more suitable, there’s more daylight and the pelagic fish really come on the chew. To prepare yourself for the busy summer fishing season there’s some preparation you should do to ensure you effectively maximise your fishing time. Just don’t leave it too late to do some of the things on this list! Some of these Fishing Preparation tasks you can do before each trip, and some should ideally be done quarterly or yearly to ensure you spend less time fixing and more time fishing.

Service the boat & trailer

Whether it be the motor or trailer, both need our attention as they will be used more in summer than any other time. No one wants a bad trip, so get the motor serviced and checked over by a marine professional. With the trailer do a visual inspection, check everything is working, as no one wants to be sitting on the side of the road with a broken trailer in summer.

Have you got a spare wheel for the trailer and is it pumped up? It is surprising the number of boaties that don’t have this simple spare. Has everything been given a light spray of WD40 like winches, hatch hinges to make sure they work smoothly?

When was the last time you replaced your trailer bearings? Jack up the wheels of the trailer and give them a spin and if you cannot hear noise or if the wheels aren’t loose when given a shake then they should be fine. If you are a frequent user of your boat and often covering long distances it is recommended that you should change your wheel bearings more often.

Next, test all the lights on the trailer, and here is where the use of LED lights come into play as they are maintenance free. So if you have them also the check the plugs and wiring for any nicks or splits to ensure they all work. Don’t forget your battery if you have one. Check the charging levels and if it needs water, check those levels too and top up as required.

One last thing on the motor, put the muffs on and run the motor for a few minutes and see the tell-tale outlet has a good stream of water. So many times I see guys at the ramp trying to kick over a motor that hasn’t been run since last summer and leave it until the day to test functionality. A test the night before will save you headaches and embarrassment at the ramp and give you piece of mind before heading out.

Also check your fuel, and if older than a month than don’t use it and replace with a fresh batch. Fuel can go off if left for long periods of time and never use “e10” on boat motors as it can attract unwanted moisture that could cause you problems in the long-term. It is worth paying the extra 10c a litre for premium.

Another thing to check is the electronic switch panels as they can corrode in marine environment easily as can the wiring, so it is worth checking all electrics for operation. Put the sounder on in demo mode to make sure it is working, for me heading out with a sounder is like fishing blind. I like running the sounder also to check battery levels as mine has a power level indicator. Spot the broken winch post on the author’s boat on a recent trip! He should have fixed it after first noticing a crack in the weld – it ruined an afternoon bass session.

Check you safety gear is not damaged, out of date and working.

As we do checks on all the mechanical components, the safety gear also needs our attention as it is may save your life one day. Is your bilge pump working? Recently, mine got jammed with corrosion and started to overheat and melt, which is not good in a plastic boat. Some maintenance and more regular checking could have prevented this from happening and saved me the replacement cost and time to fix.

Are your life jackets still in the plastic the boat came with? Not a good idea if you need to get them on real quick? Are they easy to grab or tucked up with stuff up on them? I really think it is worth the $70-150 upgrading to the wearable inflatable type, they are not that expensive, take up less room and if you have them on can be deployed instantly.

Setup the right anchor for the terrain before you head out.

Is your anchor rope and chain ok and can you get to it quickly? Many years ago a friend’s motor failed while testing a new sounder in the river and he got sucked out of the river bar from a safe location in two minutes. He didn’t get enough time to get out the anchor properly and his reef pick was the wrong type for the river. The boat with new sounder was lost and never recovered as it sank on the bar. Luckily his life jackets were easily grabbed and put on and he was unharmed.

What about the NAV lights? a two second check to test them is all it takes. Check your NAV lights are working as you do with trailer lights. Don’t forget the anchor light too as it is required after dark. It is also A good idea to undertake a radio test before you head outside and log on with marine rescue or with another handheld VHF or 27 Mhz if you have access to them.

While safety gear varies for inshore and offshore there are a few basics you should have besides life jackets. I like to take a couple of 5ltr water containers with fresh water, some spare 8mm rope (30m), a spare anchor, a spare knife, lighter, toilet paper, spare bucket, touch, v-sheet and mirror and decent first aid kit. A spare hat, towel and fishing shirt in a dry bag is also tucked up in the hatch. While those last items are not really safety gear they all come in handy if you forget them or lose them on the water. Keeping out of the sun is sort of safety in some climates and essential if you live north in QLD/NT. Newer style wearable life jackets take up less room and aren’t obtrusive for fishing.

Service your fishing gear.

Fishing reels should be serviced at least every 12 months if used regularly. You can DIY service a reel or take to local tackle shops who do for it $30-40 if the reel does not need any parts. Inspect the reel for rust, sharp nicks and test the drag is not sticking. Who wants to lose the fish of a lifetime due to lack of maintenance? Give the rod a wipe with a silicon spray and ensure all runners have no cracks or have nicks. If there is damage you can DYI a new runner or runner insert or get your local tackle shop to replace it for you.

Check and Replace line

Re-spool and replace line from last season if line load is low. While inspecting the reels check the line for damage or wear. Replace if damaged or sun baked as you don’t want line to break on your next big hook-up. In some cases only the top 3-5 m needs to be removed and the rest of the line can be re-used. Braid can be reversed and re-spooled so the end that had all the use is at the opposite end of the reel. Re-tie old knots from last trip including braid to mono leaders. This way you can trust your most recent knot. Spool’s looking a bit low, time to re-spool!


The main thing Tweed Tackle and Marine hope you take away from this Fishing Preparation article, rather than a definitive list of must-do fishing preparation tasks, is a desire to explore the endless land-based options in your area and right around this great country. You don’t need a boat to catch great fish. It may require slightly more planning to do it consistently, but the challenge and reward of land-based fishing is enough to hook you for life.

Like our article about Fishing Preparation then LIKE US on Facebook 🙂

It’s now easier for people to find our Facebook Page in search. People can also visit our Page at fb.me/TweedFishingStore and send messages to our Page at m.me/TweedFishingStore.


Summer Fishing Preparation

Summer Fishing Preparation Part 2

Summer Fishing PreparationGet prepared this SUMMER! We hope you enjoyed Part 1 of Summer Fishing Preparation Advice, now lets dive straight into Part 2 shall we?

Check lures and replace terminals if worn.

Don’t be lazy and check your lures, split rings and trebles regularly. Remember the hook is the point of connection with the fish, so you want the sharpest hook you can have, even if that means sharpening it before use or replace if rusty. I use VMC barbless galvanised trebles on my estuary lures, they are longer lasting, have good points and the barbless models are best for catch and release (and for pulling out of fingers, net carpet etc…) You’ve got to have sharp hooks if you want to stay connected to flatties.

Invest in good sun protection.

We all know how bad the sun can be on our skin and given the range of products and equipment, there is no excuse for getting burnt these days. Getting sunburnt can also lead to heat stroke or dehydration which can ruin things after a day on the water. If we are comfy, then we can fish longer and selecting lightweight fishing apparel that is sun rated is a good investment. Columbia, Rapala, Shimano, BigFish etc. all offer a range of fishing apparel to suit each budget. Major chain stores also stock their own brands and if you have the coin there are customised fish species shirts which are all the rage. Fishing never looked so hip these days with the range that is available.

New spray-on sunscreens make application easier and some contain insect repellent. I personally think it is better to cover up fully with light fabrics so you don’t have to apply as much sunscreen. Head socks are the latest fad and completely protect the neck and ears if pulled up on the head and cap – a simple but effective concept.

Invest in a decent set of polarised sunglasses and protect your eyes as sunlight can be amplified on the water. Besides the wide brim hat, there are a range of wrap around styles to protect the neck, face and head.

Check your soft plastics

There’s nothing worse than going to use a scented soft plastic and the bag has leaked and they’re all dried up. You can re-juice soft plastics with refill packs; check packets for any leaks and replace them if they won’t seal or leak. I estimate an average fisherman will have nearly $2000+ worth of soft plastics, so it’s worthwhile protecting your investment and checking the packets for damage/leaks. Some can be re-juiced and will expand to normal size, for most of the Berkley range this will work. I double-bag some of my soft plastics in larger resealable bags for extra protection and keep them out of the sun.

Check your crab gear.

Summer is crabbing time. Re-string the dilly nets, check ropes and floats on the pots, make up some new bait holders with folded over gutter guard. Crabbing is great fun and combined with the next two items, summer is the best time to go. I have spare sets of dillies and traps so I can do back to back trips without major repairs. A simple roll of builder’s string in the boat is also good to do repairs on the water. Summertime is crabbing time.

Fish more short trips

Australia in summer in most parts of the country is bloody hot. It’s a good time to utilise dusk and dawn times to have a fish. It is better to avoid the heat and side effects that come along with it like sunburn, dehydration and heat exhaustion. I pay more attention to tide times and look for high tide early in the morning and fish till mid-morning or a high tide in the afternoon around 4-5pm. Short trips also see me in good stead with the better half as I am only out for 3-4 hrs instead of a full day! Nothing better than a sunset on the water in summer.

Take someone new fishing.

Introduce someone new to fishing this summer. Teach a person to fish, feed them for a lifetime (well most trips). Hopefully they get the bug too and want to go as much as you. Summer is the best time to be on the water as more time can be spent both day and night. My youngest daughter has recently be promoted to my regular deckie on arvo trips. She is eager to come at the drop of hat and has become an expert on the electric and spotting “snag city” on bass trips. She nailed her first bass of 38 cms this season, her best fish to date.


The main thing Tweed Tackle and Marine hope you take away from this Fishing Preparation article, rather than a definitive list of must-do fishing preparation tasks, is a desire to explore the endless land-based options in your area and right around this great country. You don’t need a boat to catch great fish. It may require slightly more planning to do it consistently, but the challenge and reward of land-based fishing is enough to hook you for life.

Like our article about Fishing Preparation then LIKE US on Facebook 🙂

It’s now easier for people to find our Facebook Page in search. People can also visit our Page at fb.me/TweedFishingStore and send messages to our Page at m.me/TweedFishingStore.


BEACH FISHING

Beach Fishing Tips

BEACH FISHING

The secret to successful fishing is primarily the ability to read a beach by water action, colour and current. This is best achieved from a high vantage point with a pair of polarising sunglasses on, before venturing down to commence fishing.

BEACH FISHING TACKLE

The best style of tackle to use on a beach depends on where you happen to be. In the northern rivers and southern Queensland, Australian-owned Alvey sidecast reels and long rods dominate the baitfishing scene. The unique Alvey reel is accepted throughout Australia as being a reliable, efficient product.

Alvey reels owe their origins to Charles Alvey, an English migrant who in 1920 saw the need for a fishing reel that was easy to use, easy to cast, simple to maintain, and solidly constructed to give years of trouble-free angling.

His design allowed the body of the reel to be turned sideways when casting, so the line stripped freely from the edge of a specially shaped spool. This took away the problem of backlash and overrun. When the reel was returned to the fishing position, it had the best positive direct rewind of a centrepin reel.

The Alvey sidecast reel’s simple design, and lack of moving parts that can be fouled by grit or water, make it a truly durable product. Most surf rods are about 3.5m long and in two-piece configuration. The average surf rod can be used to cast sinkers up to 100g, which is adequate for most fishing situations. When the surf is light and side drift limited, it is preferable to use a lighter sinker.

My advice is to go for a rod that you can handle in terms of its weight and power. Rod blank taper and construction determine distance, not the actual weight of the rod. How far you should aim to cast on a beach depends on where the channels or gutters are; some days they will be almost at your feet.

You must also decide whether you intend using a sidecast, overhead or threadline reel, as rod runners and reel seat locations are different. Threadline and sidecast rods have fewer guides and these are mounted higher than those bound on rods for overhead reels. The reel seat on a sidecast reel is closer to the butt end of the rod. If you are new to surf fishing, then the easiest way to start is with a threadline reel.

Overhead reels can be a problem in terms of getting an overrun when casting. The advantage of an overhead reel is that an experienced angler will cast further and maintain better control in a battle with a big fish. The rod and reel should be balanced to suit each other and the line weight. An 8-10kg outfit is a good starting point.

Braid lines are all the go at present but I recommend monofilament as the line of first choice. Braid is thinner than monofilament but it also tangles into impossible birds’ nests, and doesn’t have the same degree of abrasion resistance as the thicker monofilament lines.

BEACH FISHING RIGS

When fishing for tailor, the rig is a short piece of piano wire attached to a set of ganged hooks, which are inserted into a garfish or pilchard. Bream, dart and flathead are caught using a running sinker a small ball sinker allowed to run down to a No.2 or No.3 hook. Preferred bait is beachworm or whitebait.

Rod holders are used with threadline or overhead rods. No need to buy them, you can make your own simply by purchasing about a metre of 50mm diameter PVC tubing and cutting a 45-degree angle on one end. In the case of the sidecast, the angler generally holds his rod in a rod bucket at his waist.

Spinning is popular, and despite the advances in soft plastic lures, many of the old-fashioned chrome metal lures such as slices and Twisties still produce results.

BEACH FISHING BAIT

Pilchards, garfish, bluebait, whitebait, squid, pipi, beachworm and sandworm are commonly used baits. Anglers wanting to hook bigger fish prefer big baits like fillets, fish heads and squid heads.

A small nylon bait board is one of the handiest items you can take, as it can be difficult filleting a fish or cutting a squid strip on sand.


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Tweed River Fish Species

Tweed River Fish Species

Tweed River Fish Species

Whether you’re an amateur or a professional, Tweed Tackle and marine can provide everything you need to enjoy a great day fishing. Like us on Facebook to get all the latest scoops on the best fishing spots and info. about tide times and legal length and limits. The Tweed River is well known for excellent fishing

Tweed River Fish Species include:

Flathead – Sand or Tiger

  • All larger fish are female and are generally released after being caught. The Flesh is whitish, firm with great eating qualities
  • Best Time: During summer months
  • Best Bait: Prawns, White Pilchards, Squid, Live Sandworms, WA Pilchards, Blue Bait, Fisho (chicken gut), Mullet fillets
  • Size / Bag Limits: Min size 33cm, only 1 allowed over 70cm and 20 in total

Bream – Yellow Fin or Black

  • The Flesh is white and excellent eating
  • Best Time: All year but May to August is the best time
  • Best Bait: Prawns, White Pilchards, Squid, Live Sandworms, WA Pilchards, Blue Bait, Fisho (chicken gut), Mullet fillets
  • Size / Bag: Limit: Min size 25 cm and 20 in total (combined with Tarwhine)

Tarwhine

  • Generally caught in same areas as Bream. The Flesh is white and good eating
  • Best Time: All year but May to August is the best time
  • Best Bait: Prawns, White Pilchards, Squid, Live Sandworms, WA Pilchards, Blue Bait, Fisho (chicken gut), Mullet fillets
  • Size / Bag Limits: Min size 20cm and 20 in total (combined with Bream)

Whiting

  • Very good eating with sweet white Flesh
  • Best Time: Can be caught all year but best in the summer months
  • Best Bait: Live Sandworms, Prawns
  • Size / Bag Limits: Min size 27cm and 20 in total

Tailor

  • Nice to eat when fresh
  • Best Time: All year but best in winter
  • Best Bait: WA Pilchards, White Pilchards, Blue Bait, Mullet fillets
  • Size / Bag Limits: Min size 30cm and 20 in total

Mud Crab

Only one crab pot per person!

  • Mud crabs favour soft muddy bottoms below the low tide level and are generally found in the mud flats and mangroves
  • Normally caught in traps or dillies with fish heads such as mullet for bait
  • Best Time: Spring to Autumn
  • Best Bait: Mullet
  • Size / Bag Limits: Min size 8.5 cm and 5 in total

Blue Swimmer Crab

  • Adult crabs are highly regarded for their taste
  • Best Time: Summer months
  • Best Bait: Mullet
  • Size / Bag Limits: Min size 6cm and 20 in total

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spearfishing tips

Spearfishing Tips and Tricks

spearfishing tips

Everyone wants to know how to become a better spearfisher and this page of spearfishing tips will help you quickly improve and become a better underwater hunter.

Here are the spearfishing tips:

Don’t get weighed down with unnecessary gear. It’s important to be able to move freely and easily whilst spearfishing and a good spearfishing tip is to make sure you only take out the gear you need.

Also make sure the spearfishing equipment you are using is made for spearfishing, as it will be lighter and improve your performance. Investing in a good set of spearfishing equipment will enable you to quickly progress from beginner to intermediate level.

Maintain good health

Spearfishing, like other sports, can be hard and tiring on the body so a great spearfishing tip is to make sure you maintain a high level of fitness and health to ensure you can perform safely and at a high standard whilst spearfishing. As spearfishers are usually big into the water, swimming is a great way to improve your fitness and inturn improve your spearfishing skills.

Wear a weight belt

The first spearfishing tip was to avoid unnecessary weight, however a weight belt is a very important and necessary piece of spearfishing equipment. Whilst spearfishing you are constantly fighting against buoyancy to stay underwater. A great spearfishing tip is to attach a weight belt to your waist to help you conserve energy as you won’t have to fight the buoyancy as much.

However, always remember a spearfisher should be positively buoyant as far down as 10m so, in the case of a blackout, the spearfisher does not sink. A good guide for whether you have the appropriate weight on yourweight belt is to get in the water and hold your breath while in a vertical position. The water level should not go more than half way up you mask and you should not be sinking. As you slowly let your breath out, you should sink very slowly.

Carry a knife

A keen sperfisher should never leave home without an underwater knife. A spearfisher without a dive knife is like a gun without bullets. When spearfishing you definitely need to take a dive knife as it is used to kill the fish once it has been speared, making it a vital piece of the spearfishing equipment. Additionally, it is unsafe to dive without a dive knife as unexpected tangles may be fatal if you are unable to escape swiftly. This spearfishing tip could become a lifesaver so ignore it at your peril.

Speargun Tips

The following spearfishing tips and techniques are for getting the most out of your speargun and to avoid any accidents. Never use your speargun unless underwater and in no circumstances aim your gun at your dive partner. Also make sure to keep in mind how far the shot will travel and never aim at your dive partner.

Another important spearfishing tip is to keep your speargun in great shape by treating it to regular maintenance. Be sure to change dynema and rubbers when required to avoid misfires, and change monoline when it begins to fray to avoid it snapping when you shoot that big fish! Always thoroughly wash your speargun with clean water and then dry your speargun when you’ve finished and store the speargun in a cool and dry place out of the sun.


The main thing Tweed Tackle and Marine hope you take away from this spearfishing tips article is a desire to explore the endless land-based options in your area and right around this great country.

Like our article about spearfishing then LIKE US on Facebook 🙂 It’s now easier for people to find our Facebook Page in search. People can also visit our Page at fb.me/TweedFishingStore and send messages to our Page at m.me/TweedFishingStore.


Landing Fish

Landing Fish

Landing Fish

Landing Fish

There are some land-based situations where it can be near impossible to land the fish without the right gear or technique. Read below for more information on landing fish.

Long Nets

Long and telescopic handled nets are available from most tackle shops and are particularly useful for rock and cliff fishing, but also some jetties and man-made structures. Great for landing fish.

Long Gaffs

If you are targeting large game, then a net may not cut it. In similar elevated locations, a flying or long handled gaff can be used to land fish you intend to keep.

Rope Gaff

A rope gaff is a unique piece of kit. It is essentially a claw made out of large hooks. This claw is attached to length of rope and slid down the mainline. When it reaches the fish the claws open and the fish is secured to the rope, which can then be hauled up by the angler.

Lasso or Tail Rope

A simple technique of slipping a looped rope over the tail end of the fish and either securing it for release, or hauling it ashore. It requires some skill to execute, but can be fashioned as an alternative to specialised landing gear from rope you have handy.

Wave Landing

One simple technique is to wash the fish you have caught onto the rocks. Simply time your last retrieve for an incoming surge and try to negotiate the fish onto a flat ledge or shelf, from which it can be retrieved once the wave has subsided.

Check out our fishing stores to begin shopping now.


The main thing Tweed Tackle and Marine hope you take away from this Landing Fish article is a desire to explore the endless land-based options in your area and right around this great country.

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How To Target Sand Whiting

How To Target Sand Whiting

How To Target Sand Whiting

How To find sand whiting

Sand whiting inhabit sandy areas within estuaries, bays and coastal beaches at a depth generally between 0.5-6m. When targeting whiting within an estuary focus on the sand flats during an incoming tide, particularly the upper reaches of the tidal front, and channel edges during the run out tide. On the beach, look for areas of interest such as shallow gutters and holes, corrugated trenches and divots, and also the edges of washy sandbars.

How to target sand whiting

When targeting Sand whiting you have the option of bait fishing in estuaries, bays and beaches vs surface luring in estuaries and bays. When bait fishing use live or fresh bait and incorporate a slow retrieve with the occasional pause into your style. When surface luring constantly cover new ground, cast up current and retrieve with the tide, and vary the action and pace of retrieve. Throwing a pause into a fast erratic retrieve is dynamite on timid fish. To set the hook with whiting employ a slow lift or gentle lean rather than a sharp strike.

Rod & Reel

To get more enjoyment out of your Sand whiting fishing it’s best to adopt a finesse approach with a lightweight, light line outfit. In protected waters go for something like a 2-4kg 7 foot graphite spin rod and a 1000-2500 size reel to suit.

On the surf beaches use a light 10-12 foot rod and balance with a 4000-6000 size spin reel or a lightweight graphite Alvey.

Line and leader

  • Bait: 4-6lb monofilament & 0.5-1.0m 4-6lb fluorocarbon leader.
  • Lure: 2-4lb braid & 1.5m 4-6lb monofilament leader (the shorter the more action imparted).

Terminal Tackle

  • Size 4-8 long shank hook, size 4-8 swivel, and size 0-2 ball sinker (slightly heavier in the surf).
  • Fine gauge, roughly size 12 treble.

Hints and Tips for How To Target Sand Whiting

Sand whiting are generally caught in estuaries, bays and surf beaches from northern Queensland to Tasmania. Anglers adopt a finesse approach and use light line, lightweight outfits and live baits or surface lures to target them.

 

1) When fishing the sand flats cast into the sun where possible as silhouettes or shadows cast over the water easily spook Sand whiting.

2) When surface luring vary your retrieve and figure out what mood they’re in and what’s working best on the day.

3) Stopping and pausing a slow retrieved bait or fast, erratic retrieved lure is dynamite.

4) The ideal conditions for surface luring the flats are: rising barometer, sun in the face and wind at your back, casting up current and retrieving with the tide.

Miscellaneous Fishing Tackle Essentials

Aside from obviously needing a rod and reel, other things that you will eventually need would be a fishing tackle box, needle-nose pliers, a net, and perhaps an ice chest.

A few items that that will come in handy would include a map, bobbers, sliders, snap swivels, leaders, and a stringer.

Check out our fishing stores to begin shopping now.


The main thing Tweed Tackle and Marine hope you take away from this How To Target Sand Whiting article is a desire to explore the endless land-based options in your area and right around this great country.

Like our article about How To Target Sand Whiting then LIKE US on Facebook 🙂 It’s now easier for people to find our Facebook Page in search. People can also visit our Page at fb.me/TweedFishingStore and send messages to our Page at m.me/TweedFishingStore.


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Freshwater Fishing Techniques

Freshwater Fishing Techniques

Freshwater Fishing TechniquesBasic Freshwater Fishing Techniques

Best Fishing Baits

One of the most consistent methods to catch fish is with a worm – live worms or soft plastic worms.

But, are worms the best baits to use for catching fish?

Night Fishing

Another great way to catch fish, especially in overly fished areas, is to fish at night. I have found quite often that many bigger sized fish don’t seem to bite as much during the day. Bigger fish are much wiser and are more cautious with their approach to surviving on a daily basis.

Gaining Fishing Experience

Basic Tactics of Freshwater Fishing

Fishing for beginners and experts is productive when sticking with the basics. As you progress and learn, try new things to see what works and what doesn’t. Experimenting is all part of fishing. There will be times when nothing seems to work. That’s when you remind yourself to revert back to your fishing basics, and even bring out your go-to set up.

Freshwater Fishing Techniques

There are certain times that fish will hit just about anything. But, what are you going to do when the bite is off? Most of us have our go-to set up to revert to when the going gets tough. Most great anglers routinely use simple basic techniques of fishing to get fish to bite when those tough times arise while out on the water.

More Fishing Information

Feel free to navigate around this site for more freshwater fishing tips and techniques geared toward freshwater fishing for beginners. Consider checking this out if you are interested in knowing how to effectively spend your time pond fishing. And just a little reminder that these tips aren’t only geared toward fishing for beginners, because all anglers alike routinely use these techniques everyday for great success out on the water.

Choosing the best fishing kayak.

Fishing – What does it mean to you?

Fishing Terms and Definitions – Ever wondered what that crazy sounding word or phrase means? Sometimes it seems like fishermen have their own language, right? Or maybe you are just stumped or curious to know exactly the meaning of a certain phrase that has caught your eye. Well, use our fishing glossary to look it up.

Are you a freshwater fishing fanatic? Me too! Find out about signs and signals of being addicted to angling. Even learn about how you can benefit from doing what you enjoy doing as a hobby in your spare time.


Freshwater Fishing

Basic Freshwater Fishing For Beginners

Freshwater Fishing

Fishing for beginners may seem to feel a bit overwhelming when thinking about getting started.

There are so many things to consider as a fisherman – the equipment, the costs and expenses, when, where, and how to fish.

Well, I’m here to let you know that it’s not such a big deal, nor as frustrating as it sounds. For starters,…

Freshwater fishing continues to grow as one of the world’s most popular outdoor activities. And rightfully so, because it’s fun, easy and affordable.

To help you realize that fishing for beginners can be as fun of an experience as it should be, we’ll cover some simple, easy to understand, and basic fishing tips.

Let’s get started…

Basic Set-Up For Freshwater Fishing

You can easily get yourself started with a basic set-up, even if you’re on a relatively low budget.

To start out, you’ll obviously need a fishing rod, reel and line. You’ll also need a few weights, hooks, and some bait. Or you might want to just use some lures instead of the traditional bait on a hook.

You can find very inexpensive fishing rod-and-reel combos that are already spooled with fishing line at various places that sell fishing tackle. Spinning reels are ideal and just about the easiest to learn to use. It depends on the type of fish and where you’ll be fishing to know exactly what type of a set-up that you will need.

It’s a good idea to ask your local fishermen or a bait shop about the fishery you intend to go to. Don’t be afraid to ask questions. The angling community is usually quite friendly, informative and very helpful as they know all too well that fishing for beginners is much like learning how to ride a bike.

Take a camera with you to snap some photos of the fish, family, friends, and even the scenery. Don’t forget to share your freshwater fishing pictures with the rest of us on our Facebook Page.

Freshwater Fishing Must Have Necessities

Before you even hit the water, you will need a fishing license.

The cost of a fishing license varies for each state. You can contact your local fish and game department to find out how much a fishing license will be for you.

You can also purchase a license from a bait shop, a marina, online, some sporting goods stores, or other shopping retailers that participate in selling fishing licenses.

Freshwater Fishing Laws and Regulations

It’s important to know and understand your local fishing regulations and rules for the type of fishing that you will be doing. You’ll need to know and understand the number of fishing poles that you are allowed to use, how many hooks on each line, the types of hooks, size and limits of the fish permitted to keep, the seasons that you are allowed to fish for some species, and so forth.

All of these restrictions and fees play a very important role in where our future rests within the hands of our children and generations to come. Every little thing that we do today becomes a huge difference with fishing conservation.

Again, check with your local fish and game department. The rules and laws are constantly updated and change every year. When in doubt, just check.

Fishing safety is not only vital for yourself and your well being, but it’s just as important for other fishermen, women and children around you and in the near vicinity.

Safety equipment is important to have, like a first aid kit, hook remover kit, a lighter, and a flashlight.

Miscellaneous Freshwater Fishing Tackle Essentials

Aside from obviously needing a rod and reel, other things that you will eventually need would be a fishing tackle box, needle-nose pliers, a net, and perhaps an ice chest.

A few items that that will come in handy would include a map, bobbers, sliders, snap swivels, leaders, and a stringer.

Check out our fishing stores to begin shopping now.

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Finding Fish

Finding Fish

Finding FishFinding Fish

With twisting rivers and tributaries and various levels of flowing water it can be really hard to known where to fish if you’re new to the fishery although don’t be put off by that as with a keen eye you’ll pick up the prime spots pretty quickly.

Watch other anglers who are doing well (no doubt there will be plenty of people hooking up all over the place) and have a good look at their stretch of water to see what is making it fish so well.

Usually this will be a deeper edge running along a bank or something similar. Basically, you’re looking for those pathways for fish to move up the river and naturally out of camouflage, the fish will prefer to move through the deeper sections where they can’t been seen as well.

In saying this though, don’t overlook every stretch of shallow water as the fish will eventually have to run the gauntlet and some surprisingly shallow water will hold good numbers at times.

Don’t be fooled into thinking that they aren’t there if you can’t see them. Unless it’s crystal clear they can be incredibly well camouflaged and I’m constantly amazed when a solid fish is caught without being sighted first in shallow water.


The main thing Tweed Tackle and Marine hope you take away from this Finding Fish article is a desire to explore the endless land-based options in your area and right around this great country.

Like our article about Finding Fish then LIKE US on Facebook 🙂 It’s now easier for people to find our Facebook Page in search. People can also visit our Page at fb.me/TweedFishingStore and send messages to our Page at m.me/TweedFishingStore.


Fishing Top Picks Australia Wide

Fishing Top Picks Australia Wide

Fishing Top Picks Australia Wide

Fishing Top Picks Australia Wide – NSW

Windermere Dam, Western NSW – Famous for its land-based potential. Work rocky points or timber close to shore for Murray cod, silver perch, catfish, and golden perch. Floating hard bodied lures, or bait fishing works best.

Murrumbidgee River- NSW – This famous river runs through the heart of out nation and holds Australia’s largest freshwater fish, the Murray cod. Other native species are available, but try casting large deep divers and poppers for a big green-fish from the shore.

Tantangra Dam, NSW – Freshwater dam near Canberra. Try hardbodies, Tassie Devils, or baits from the shore for brown and rainbow trout.

Fishing Top Picks Australia Wide – Queensland

Tully River, North Queensland – Follow the Bruce highway to the power station and Tully Gorge. Sooty grunter, jungle perch, mangrove jack and tarpon are all available in the clear tropical fresh waters.

Seisia Wharf (Cape York), Queensland – Some people have claimed this is the best wharf fishing in the country. The local holiday park guarantees a catch. The action is what you would expect of the tip of Cape York with regular captures of barra, queenfish, mackerel, trevally and countless other species.

Cooktown, Queensland – The rock wall on the southern side of the Endeavour river mouth is a favourtie spot. Archer point to the south is another alternative with access to deeper water. Mackerel, barra, GTs.

1770 Headland, Queensland – The headland at 1770 is littered with accessible rock platforms. Cobra, mackerel, trevally, emperor, red throat, cod, and more pelagic species.

Fishing Top Picks Australia Wide – Victoria

Eildon Dam, VIC – Recent rains have improved the fishing greatly. Work the fringes of the lake where fish should be foraging the newly reclaimed land. A perfect situation for land-based anglers targeting cod and yellowbelly.

The main thing Tweed Tackle and Marine hope you take away from this article, rather than a definitive list of must-go fishing trip locations, is a desire to explore the endless land-based options in your area and right around this great country. You don’t need a boat to catch great fish. It may require slightly more planning to do it consistently, but the challenge and reward of land-based fishing is enough to hook you for life.

Like our article about Fishing Top Picks Australia Wide then LIKE US on Facebook 🙂

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Modern Fishing's Favourite Spots

Modern Fishing’s Favourite Spots

Modern Fishing's Favourite SpotsModern Fishing’s Favourite Spots – New South Wales

Ballina Breakwall

Both the north and south walls are accessible and offer similar fishing options. Whiting, flathead, bream, tailor, blackfish, jewfish, and snapper are all available at Ballina break wall. Occasional mackerel and other pelagic species are taken when the currents warm up.

Iluka/Yamba

The Clarence River separates these two townships, with a break wall on either side of the river mouth. Fish the end of the walls with metals, poppers and live baits for sport fish. Estuary species available closer in from the start of the wall, beaches, or adjacent parks.

South West Rocks

Fish the rocks below the gaol for some great land based options. Bread and butter species are taken all year round, with the potential of some hot pelagic action. Alternatively the nearby Macleay River is easily accessible, particularly near the mouth.

Nambucca Heads & River

Nambucca Heads and the river are an endless flats paradise that any flathead would be lucky to call home. Home to huge schools of fat bream, this system is alive with bait and healthy fish.

More Modern Fishing’s Favourite Spots

Hat Head

This location is noted for its LBG action. Snapper, mulloway, spanish and spotted mackerel, cobra, marlin, kingfish, and tuna are all possibilities here as the continental shelf is relatively close to the coast.

Tomaree Headland, Nelson Bay

Famous LBG location on the southern headland of Nelson Bay. Countless rock platforms provide options for anglers targeting pelagic species with lures, and live baits.

The Tubes, Jervis Bay

Possibly Australia’s most famous land-based fishing spot. The tubes are known for their regular catches of marlin and other billfish from the stones, as well as tuna and large pelagics like kingfish.


Positioning A Bait

Positioning A Bait

Positioning A BaitPositioning A Bait

Once you have identified the all-important feature, you then need to decide where within that feature you want to Positioning A Bait. If targeting large predators such as sharks and mulloway, then you will be using a stationary rig, which means the position of you bait is vital.

I generally base my decision of where to cast my bait on the tidal phase. When fishing an incoming tide I concentrate my efforts around the entrance of the gutter. This is the section where water will enter the feature from the ocean and be a high traffic area for predators coming into the gutter. Any predators coming into the gutter. Any predators entering the gutter are generally doing so in searcg of food, meaning they will be on high alert for any sort of offering.

Small foraging bait fish and schools of salmon, tailor, or mullet are prime targets of the predators. It is important that your bait can hold bottom in the strong current, so selecting sufficient weight is crucial, as you don’t want to be constantly winding in and re-casting.

The other key Positioning A Bait on an incoming tide is the calm or less turbid water off to the side of the main entrance channel. Alternatively, when fishing the last few hours of an outgoing tide, my experience and success has shown that positioning a bait adjacent to the exit point to be most effective. As water drains from the gutter, predators will prepare to move out so they are not left stranded in shallow water.

Fishing Trip

A-B-C Positioning A Bait Tips

A– Entry point’s are good positions for baits during run in tide.

B– Less current in these areas due to protection from sand bar. Good holding and searching areas for large predators.

C– Exit point’s are good positions for baits during run in tide.

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Fishing Trip

Fishing Trip Locations & Planning Tips

Fishing Trip

Planning A Fishing Trip?

Wheather you are heading down to the local wharf for a fishing trip, or planning a two-week land-based game adventure, there are some things you need to consider before you are successful from the shore.

ACCESS: Use the internet and local resources like information centres to determine the easiest and safest ways to access your chosen location before you intend to fish it. It is wise to investigate camping options if you intend to stay overnight.

SAFETY: Consider all variables and potential complications, espically in remote or potentially dangerous locations. Weather, wildlife, terrain, and the ocean itself can all be dangerous. No fish is worth injury or death.

WEATHER: A major considerationfor both the fishing potential and aforementioned safety considerations. Do your research before any fishing trip.

TOP AUSTRALIAN FISHING TRIP SPOTS

Green Cape, NSW – 20km south of Eden, LBG location. Marlin, several species of tuna, yellowtail kingfish, sharks, snapper and salmon can all be caught from Green Cape and other pelagic species. Best two platforms are Pulpit Rock and City Rocks.

Lucinda Wharf, QLD – Trevally, jacks, fingermark and the occasional barra. This long artificial structure forms the southern boundary of the Hinchinbrook channel. Fish the end for pelagics, or the drop off about half way down.

Beaches North of Doughboy River, Far North Queensland – Salon, queenfish, and the trevally are available from near the mouth of the river. Off the beaches try spinning for a saltwater barra with metals or plastics.

East Point Rock, Darwin NT – Try the rocky point out from the museum for jacks, barra, GTs, trevally, mackerel, and queenfish. Slices or poppers work well, otherwise try live-bait.

Beecroft Peninsula, NSW – Forms the northern headland of Jervis Bay and as such presents an extensive list of options. both oceanic and inside the bay.

The main thing Tweed Tackle and Marine hope you take away from this article, rather than a definitive list of must-go fishing trip locations, is a desire to explore the endless land-based options in your area and right around this great country. You don’t need a boat to catch great fish. It may require slightly more planning to do it consistently, but the challenge and reward of land-based fishing is enough to hook you for life.


Fishing Gear Suppliers GOLD COAST FISHING EVENT JUNE

Fishing Gear Suppliers Anglers Club Night

fishing gear suppliers anglers event club night

LOCAL FISHING GEAR SUPPLIERS GOLD COAST ANGLERS CLUB NIGHT

Tweed Tackle and Marine your local fishing gear suppliers, would like to invite you to our exclusive Anglers Information Event on the 24th of June starting at 5PM. Event held at 13 Greenway Drive, Tweed Heads, New South Wales 2486. Free Sausage Sizzle and Discounted Prices for those that attend! Secure your seat now before it’s to late. Head on in store or call our friendly staff on (07) 5523 3535 to find our more information!

FROM TWO OF THE VERY BEST BREAM TOURNAMENT FISHERMEN ON THE EAST COAST – OUR LOCAL VERY OWN JOE ALLEN AND OUR NORTHERN COMPATRIOT AARON SHARP AS A BONUS BOTH COMPETITION BOATS WILL BE ON DISPLAY FRIDAY AFTERNOON/EVENING.

FREE SAUSAGE SIZZLE

FROM 5.00PM TO 5.45PM

THEN HEAD UP- STAIRS TO AN EXTREMELY INFORMATIVE EVENING – COMPLETING SOMEWHERE BETWEEN 7.00PM AND 7.30PM. AS ANOTHER

BONUS

YOU WILL BE ABLE TO PURCHASE ANYTHING IN THE SHOP ON THE EVENING AT A GENEROUS 20% DISCOUNT AND IF YOU HAVE TO BOLT WE WILL OFFER A FOLLOW-UP OF 10% FOR 7 DAYS.

Tweed Tackle and Marine your local fishing gear suppliers, provide all your fishing, boating and Marine needs. Plus trailers, rod repairs, reel spooling,Boatcode, Fishing licences, etc. Tweedy will match any retail price. Products include:

  • Fishing Licences
  • Frozen Bait – Live Worms
  • Pacbay
  • Rapala
  • Ultragraph Rods
  • Silstar Rods
  • Okuma
  • Penn
  • Ocean South
  • Ocean Stream
  • Wilson
  • Abu Garcia
  • Ugly Fish Sunglasses
  • Maxus Outboard Motors
  • Boat Code
  • Trailer Parts
  • Boat Accessories

And so much more!

BOOK LIMITED NUMBERS RSVP IMMEDIATLEY, SECURE YOUR SEAT! REMEMBER THIS DATE:

FRIDAY THE 24TH

5.00PM THROUGH TO 7.30PM

The Anglers Information Club Night is sponsored by Gamakatsu.

Tweed Tackle and Marine are located in Tweed Heads. Tweedy says “We put Fishing First”. We have all your favourite brands in store. We are offering a personal touch service- rods that need repairing, or that reel that needs spooling. Tweedy and his team add lots of extra services: Fishing Licences, Bulk line winding, Bulk oils, Boat code etc.

Tweed Tackle and Marine your local fishing gear suppliers, will match any retail price. Come in and join the Marlin Club, build up credits as well as gain access to all kinds of special offers.

Forgot something? Let Tweed Tackle and Marine your local fishing gear suppliers, deliver to your home or work. We offer a 3 hour free delivery in Tweed Heads/Tweed Heads South- Ordering online from our website – www.tackandmarine.com.au

Come in and check out Tweedy’s awesome opening specials and see what a specialist fishing store can offer you. Come in and bring photos of your catches to be in the “Fishing of the Month” contest.


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